Monday, February 20, 2017


NO ‘DARKNESS INTO LIGHT’ WITHOUT GOOD SYSTEMS 


   When an NGO grows, it needs to have systems in place to rates at appointments.

handle growth. Witness Pieta House’s ‘Darkness into Light’ walks which now see up to 120,000 people taking part annually.
   Pieta House has grown significantly since it was set up in 2006. It is a non-profit organisation providing a specialised treatment programme for people who have suicidal ideation or who participate in self- harming.
   Enclude has been involved with Pieta House since 2009 and has helped it to cope successfully with the growth.


SOFTWARE FOR SOCIAL

INCLUSION

   The not-for-profit tech company ‘Enclude’ has carved a niche for itself finding solutions for groups working in the Community and Voluntary Sector.
   The organisation is now ten years old and wrote to us following our Autumn edition. To back up their points, we also took testimony from two groups they worked with
in recent years:




SURFING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

SURFING FOR A LIVING
IN SIERRA LEONE

 BY CIAN MATTHEW KEARNS


   Sustainability is key in community development. Projects that last are ones with strong local foundations. Bureh Beach Surf Club in Sierra Leone is a great example of a community-led initiative using its resources to their best advantage. Here
a determined local effort, along with a little international support, made a big difference to a small, coastal community. And it was founded by an Irishman.
   



GOVERNANCE 

FOCUS ON ‘QUALITY’ TO ENSURE GREATER EQUALITY 

   The private sector is breathing down the neck of projects operating in the community sector and disability activists from around the country expressed strong views at Sola’s national symposium held at the University of Limerick, in December, REPORTS ALLEN MEAGHER.


RURAL NEGLECT V. POTENTIAL 

WHAT SUPPORTS ARE THERE FOR RURAL UNEMPLOYED MEN?

Long-term unemployment can lead to “a lack of motivation and borderline depression”
 BY CIAN MATTHEW KEARNS



   Across rural Ireland, low quality jobs and unemployment have forced thousands of people into poverty. Yet, their suffering is rarely seen.

   Seamus Boland, CEO of Irish Rural Link, describes hidden poverty as, “the lack of opportunity available to people. It’s the falling off of services. It’s people who are getting themselves into poverty, not being able to afford basics, which you don’t really see.”
   He highlights how the problem is exasperated in rural areas: “You can travel around...and there’s no great signs of poverty there, whereas in urban you tend to see physical deterioration.”


   The figures back him up. Unemployment rates in rural Ireland continue to however around the 10% mark. In contrast, Dublin and the Mid-East score 8% and 6% respectively.

   Furthermore, a 2014 Survey on Income and Living Conditions found that almost one in five people in rural areas were at risk of poverty, compared to 15% living in urban settings. Although it might not be obvious, rural Ireland is still hurting.
   Boland says, “The solutions have to include developing much more micro-enterprises in the rural regions.” He points out that, collectively, small businesses are the largest employment providers in rural Ireland. More growth in enterprises means more local jobs and more sustainable rural communities.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017



WOMEN (NOT) IN POLITICS - THE 50/50 BY 2020 CAMPAIGN


 Gender still a glaring issue and women now campaigning locally and nationally

   The boards of national sports organisations were put under pressure in December to improve the gender balance.
   Punitive measures were talked about for organisations that failed to reach a 30% female quota, with some politicians in favour and others opposed to penalties.
   Despite women and girls playing soccer, rugby and Gaelic games, only one woman sits on the executive commitiees/boards of the FAI, IRFU and the GAA combined.
   Together, these three bodies shared €7.4m last year from the State for youth development alone and they oversee thousands of games annually involving women and girls.
 

PRIDE OF 
PLACE WINNERS

   Pride of Place is an all-island competition that acknowledges the work that communities are doing all over the island of Ireland.
   “The competition is about showing respect and inclusion for every sector in our communities, young, old, rich or poor and creating communities to which the people are proud to say they belong,” says Tom Dowling, former Meath County Manager and Chairman and Founder of the Pride of Place Initiative.